Reviews

Brit Drozda – Ribbon

Posed as questions, the lyrics allow us to imagine a young soul with a “daisy chain upon her hair”, laughing, jumping and twirling - and a free-spirited freedom complete with glitter, bare feet and wonder.

Brit Drozda - Ribbon

I’ve often heard this past year being referred to as “The Year of the Woman”. That couldn’t really be further from the truth. The actual truth is that last year only represented a coming out party of sorts. It was the year of the “come-up”. It was the year of the MeToo Movement in full stride and a host of other game-changing discussions around women and our appreciation, treatment and support thereof. Sure, last year was an important one to start this dialogue but in fairness, it should really only represent a new beginning. And we’ve got a song here to help you celebrate those moments, whenever those times are, that you just feel at your very best. Like you could take on the world. Or, for the brothers – to reminisce on or recognize the powers of those singular women in our lives that just know, how to captivate.

Hailing from Charlotte, North Carolina – and calling on fellow female inspirations from Sheryl Crow to Norah Jones to Patty Griffin – is a dynamic Folk-Rock Singer-Songwriter in Brit Drozda. On her new release here entitled “Ribbon”, Brit brings those inspirations to focus on a singular female character. And we’ve all met her, or someone like her before. Opening with a playful syncopated handclap, the picking of the acoustic guitar begins and we hear Brit’s unmistakable voice emerge. Accompanied by banjo strums and slide guitar leads, she guides us through the imagery of what might make every little girl’s life a bit more special. Posed as questions, the lyrics allow us to imagine a young soul with a “daisy chain upon her hair”, laughing, jumping and twirling – and a free-spirited freedom complete with glitter, bare feet and wonder. It is imagined that this must’ve been the obvious upbringing for the main character in this narrative.

The chorus rises with the banjo picking gathering speed and intricacy, while Brit repeatedly asks “Who is she?”. Whether these questions are being posed by the audience or Brit herself – or whether the ‘she’ in question is a third party or even a tongue-in-cheek view of Brit herself – may be left entirely up to the interpreter here. I like to think of it, as the celebration of a woman in her element. Truly being her own best self and exuding it. Dancing through our worlds with or without accompaniment. There’s a universal appeal to that interpretation of course, but the expertly written verses allow for us to also take them to be entirely personal, if we choose. It’s a power that Brit has flirted with here, and has definitely made the most of. The second verse really brings the story home, as “when she walks in tonight”, the room will be still, the colours and light will reflect and radiate, and she will simply put “the stars to shame”.

Brit Drozda

Come to think of it, there’s a reason why this narrative might apply to so many interpretations, beyond Brit’s ability to draw us all in this way. It might just be that there are so many women that this could easily be about. In our lives, in our relationships, and really – even Brit herself is having a moment worthy of that same appreciation and awe. She is clearly in her element, and clearly capable of commanding our attention. So dance like a Ribbon on a southern breeze, Brit. Dance like nobody’s watching. But I’m afraid you might just have a few of us here to enjoy the spectacle!

You can find her links below and don’t miss out on her brand new interpretation of “The Middle”, by Jimmy Eat World!

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the authorFrank M'Otion
Reviewer
Frank M'Otion is somewhat of a mystery man, but has achieved some pretty remarkable things in the music industry under different pseudonyms.  As a Producer and Writer, an Artist and Mentor - he has chaperoned the careers of several bands, rappers and singers across multiple genres.  As a studied music historian and an independent music advocate, he has been commissioned to write with For The Love Of Bands strictly and literally, For The Love..

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